A European Dinner: Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle

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♫…..Cream colored ponies and crisp apple streudels………♫.. Doorbells and sleigh bells and schnitzel with noodles!♫

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (6) I made schnitzel with noodles for you guys and I’m really excited about it, although I’m momentarily distracted by the idea of crisp apple struedel, doesn’t that sound really good right now? Sorry, anyway, yeah I made this very European dish to share.

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle I think I may have just made this recipe so I could say weiner schnitzel. Try it, oh and with a heavy German accent, veen-er schneets -ul! See, so much fun! No, I really made it because Lela’s birthday was a few days ago and I didn’t have any beets to make what she wanted, ukrainian borscht, so I decided to try something from other European countries near Ukraine. They make a very similar dish in Ukraine too so I thought this might be nostalgic to her.

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (4) I didn’t know what schnitzel was until a few days ago. I obviously need to get out more. It’s like when you’re little, I don’t know about, say….Japanese kids, but when I was really young I used to think the U.S. map was the world. I also thought English was the plain language (like vanilla flavor) and it was everyone else who had an accent or spoke weird languages. Go ahead and laugh, I know I was pretty silly. At least just tell me that one of you thought the same thing about you’re country and language…..anyone?

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (3) So if you are as uncultured as I am then you might be wondering what schnitzel with noodles is exactly. That’s okay, I love The Sound of Music and I’ve listened to Maria sing about it countless times thinking it was some kind of bread or something. Well, schnitzel is actually breaded meat cutlets and spaetzle is egg noodles. The word schnitzel actually means cutlet in German and the word weiner means Viennese. Technically it’s supposed to be and was originally made with veal, but now people use chicken, beef, or pork also. Way to ruin a classic, right?

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (7) I also found out that the Polish version uses ground meat like I did, in case you were wondering about that too. I bet it’s better with cutlets but I only had ground mat on hand, so yeah, Polish style works and was really popular with the meat-heads around here.

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (2) It’s really a simple dish, when I make things like this it always feels more complicated to me because I make like 5 times the amount of a normal family, but for most people this will be a quick dinner. Speaking of that, I decided to just bake the schnitzel because I had spent way too much time playing with making the spaetzle and it was getting late, but you can decide how you want to do it (obviously).

A European Dinner Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle (5) p.s. I think doing really bad imitations of German/Europian accents is required while making this!

A European Dinner: Polish Pork Schnitzel and German Buttered Spaetzle

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 2 hours

Yield: 8 - 10

Ingredients

    Pork Schnitzel:
  • 1 pound of ground pork
  • 1/2 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup panko or homemade breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon each of paprika, dill, parsley, and pepper
  • about 1 cup additional breadcrumbs for coating
  • olive or sunflower oil for frying (optional)
  • Spaetzle:
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup (about 6 tablespoons) butter
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

    Schnitzel:
  1. Line a baking sheet with foil and mix all ingredients except breadcrumbs for coating in a large bowl. Divide into patties, it should make about 10, and dip each into breadcrumbs to coat. Place on prepared tray.
  2. Heat about 1/2 inch of oil in a large skillet and fry for 3 to 4 minutes per side until done. Alternatively, you can bake in oven at 350 degrees F (180 C) or quick fry and finish in oven.
  3. Spaetzle:
  4. Beat eggs and milk together in a large mixing bowl. Add flour and seasoning and mix until thick and smooth. Allow mixture to sit for about 20 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Pour about 1/4 of the mixture into a colander with large holes and use a spatula to push it through into boiling water. Cook for about 3 minutes until spaetzle starts to float to the top. Remove with a slooted spoon into a strainerand repeat last step until all the spaetzle is cooked. Rinse in cold water and set aside until ready to serve.
  6. Heat butter in a large skillet and add spaetzle. Gently stir and cook until starting to turn lightly golden. Salt and pepper to taste and serve hot.

Notes

spaetzle adapted from food network

http://gringalicious.com/a-european-dinner-polish-pork-schnitzel-and-german-buttered-spaetzle/

 

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Comments

  1. says

    That all looks mighty tasty! I just tried spaetzle for the first time earlier this year and it made quite an impression on me – I’ll have to give it a try sometime. Although I knew as a child that English wasn’t the default or base language of the world, I was still quite frustrated the first time I went to a museum in another country where there weren’t any placards in English!

    • Tori says

      I hope if you try it you enjoy it, Thalia and I’m so glad I could bring good memories to mind! Thanks!

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